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I LOVE LIMERICK – FEBRUARY 17TH, 2021

The Freezbrury Fundraiser Challenge for Milford Hospice funds has been taken on by Limerick students Mike Ryan, from Castletroy and Jack Henchy, Ballyneety.

Former professional rugby player turned adventurer Damien Browne created the original idea for the Freezbrury fundraiser. The concept consists of the participants enduring discomfort for the benefit of a more significant cause, such as fundraising for a charity or organisation that badly needs financial support.

For the month of February, Mike and Jack must plunge into the icy sea every day, each day adding a minute extra to the duration spent enduring the cold currents. The rules for the Freezbrury Challenge consist of not wearing hats, gloves, boots, trainers etc. The aim is to be submerged in the water as far as the upper chest for the entire duration, and then one must immerse their head underwater fully at least once every time.

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DUBLINLIVE – FEB 15TH, 2021

Three Dublin lads who have decided to swim to raise money for mental health charities had a bit of trouble going for their daily dip with weather warnings in place over the weekend.

Dave Murray, Paul Henry and Ian Smith are participating in Freezbrury, a challenge where they go for a swim everyday for a number of minutes based on the date of the month; February 1st: one minute, February 2nd: two minutes, and eventually adding a minute everyday until 28 minutes at the end of the month.

The trio are among hundreds of swimmers up and down the coast who are doing Freezbrury to raise funds for Pieta House, the Samaritans, Shine a Light Suicide and Mental Health Awareness Group.

But over the weekend, it was too dangerous for them to go for their daily dip in aid of the charities, but that didn’t stop them from braving the ice cold water.

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ITV- FEB 26TH, 2021

Hundreds of sea-swimming novices are taking to the ocean in February for the aptly named ‘Freezbrury’ challenge.

It involves getting into cold water every day of the month, wearing only your bathing suit.

Each day, swimmers stay in the water one minute longer than the last, eventually building up to a full 28 minutes.

The challenge was created to raise awareness around mental health and suicide prevention.

The Irish Sea is at its coldest during the month of February, with temperatures averaging around 6 degrees celsius.

Getting into cold water also has great physical benefits.

It’s been linked to improved circulation, skin and in some cases, even acts as a pain reliever.

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KILKENNY PEOPLE – FEB, 2021

A group of brave Kilkenny people are taking the plunge this month for a good cause.
The Kilkenny Freezbrury group have been dipping their toes – and more – in the chilly waters of the Nore to raise money for charity,
Now in its third year, Freezbrury is a challenge created by Irish adventurer Damian Browne, which challenges people physically and mentally through cold water immersion in the month of February each year.
Participants immerse in cold water on February 1 for one minute, two minutes on February 2 and carry on the whole way up to February 28, when they stay in the water for 28 minutes!
According to Neil Gunning and Searlait Doyle from Kilkenny’s Freezbrury group, rules are simple: You must immerse in swimwear only, with no wetsuits or boots allowed. Immersion is at chest height and everyone must dunk at least once during the time.
The challenge has been taken on nationwide by people in support of raising awareness around mental health and to raise funds for mental health charities.

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THE NATIONALIST – FEB 18th, 2022

PLUMMETING temperatures and the threat of Storm Eunice are no match to the plucky determination of a Carlow man on a mission to complete the Freezbrury Challenge!

Paul Harland (23) is taking on the Freezbrury Challenge to raise funds for Holy Angels Daycare Centre, the much-loved local centre for children with special needs.

The Freezbrury Challenge consists of getting into a lake, the sea or a river for a minute on the first day of the month, adding an extra minute every day and finishing the month with an eye-watering 28 minutes in the chilly water!

“You feel great after it,” says an upbeat Paul.

“When you get out of the water you feel like a difference person after it … there are huge health benefits to cold-water therapy: it increases circulation, decreases blood pressure, reduces stress and anxiety. And for people who have the privilege of living near the sea or water that they get in every day, they absolutely swear by it,” says Paul.

Donning only his swimming togs, Paul has been taking the plunge every day this month, building up the duration by a minute each day.

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GALWAY PULSE – FEB 20TH, 2021

With early February bringing with it high winds and forecasts of snow, the idea of getting into open water wouldn’t cross the minds of the majority of people. Sea temperatures are at their coldest in February, averaging at 8.8°C, and lake water is normally a few temperatures colder.

However, one Westmeath footballer and dozens of others across the country are taking on the physical and psychological challenge of submerging themselves in open water, adding a minute to the clock for every day they take part, amounting to a total of six hours and 46 minutes across the month of February.

Speaking not too long after the eleventh day of the challenge, Athlone man Ray Connellan explains how he got involved with what is being called ‘Freezbrury’.

“I first heard about it two years ago and I was going to do it but I moved back over to Australia, and there wasn’t much point in doing it in the Australian summer. I saw that it was happening again last year through Damien Browne. He used to play for Connacht and he’s actually preparing to climb Everest at the moment. He was posting about it on his story and looking for new ways to push himself. I just said I’d give it a try, so myself and my brother John did it last year. It was tough but we got through it,” said Ray.

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WESTMEATH – FEB 20TH, 2021

With early February bringing with it high winds and forecasts of snow, the idea of getting into open water wouldn’t cross the minds of the majority of people. Sea temperatures are at their coldest in February, averaging at 8.8°C, and lake water is normally a few temperatures colder.

However, one Westmeath footballer and dozens of others across the country are taking on the physical and psychological challenge of submerging themselves in open water, adding a minute to the clock for every day they take part, amounting to a total of six hours and 46 minutes across the month of February.

Speaking not too long after the eleventh day of the challenge, Athlone man Ray Connellan explains how he got involved with what is being called ‘Freezbrury’.

“I first heard about it two years ago and I was going to do it but I moved back over to Australia, and there wasn’t much point in doing it in the Australian summer. I saw that it was happening again last year through Damien Browne. He used to play for Connacht and he’s actually preparing to climb Everest at the moment. He was posting about it on his story and looking for new ways to push himself. I just said I’d give it a try, so myself and my brother John did it last year. It was tough but we got through it,” said Ray.

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LAOISTODAY.IE – FEB 18TH, 2022

A group of young men are putting their bodies to the test this February in a bid to raise money for the suicide prevention charity Pieta House.

A group of nine lads, including two from Laois, are more than halfway through the Freezbury Challenge.

Throughout the month of February, they have committed to getting into an open water source ever day – typically in freezing conditions.

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